Water/Climate Briefings

DCDC hosts Water/Climate Briefings on a regular basis. These briefings are a regular forum for the water-policy community, DCDC researchers, and students to exchange knowledge and ideas. The typical format is a panel of experts and community partners discussing issues such as the urban heat island, water re-use, and the energy-water nexus, followed by audience participation and questions. Since the launch of DCDC, we have hosted four to seven briefings each year, with panelists representing the scientific and professional perspectives.

Moving forward, we plan to tie Water/Climate Briefings to themes for the entire academic year and highlight the current DCDC research portfolio. Each briefing will be tailored for specific audiences and purposes. An annual Keynote will be delivered by a renowned scientist or policy professional to present a ‘grand challenge’ for the science-policy community to catalyze deliberation. The Keynote will be followed up in subsequent Water/Climate Briefings to explore basic science questions and policy implications of responding to the grand challenge.

2014-2015 Water/Climate Briefings – Climate Change and Extreme Events

October 1, 2014 – Extreme Climate Events: Heat and its Impact on Health

The risk of climate extremes is likely to intensify with the impacts of climate change, leading to efforts to enhance resilience and capacity to adapt. Throughout the year, we will discuss the possible nature of future extreme events and strategies to prepare and cope with hotter temperatures, increased fire frequency, extreme floods, and diminishing water supplies with our science, planning, and policy experts.

For our first Water/Climate Briefing for the 2014-2015 academic year, DCDC sets the stage for a wide-ranging discussion on climate change and extreme events.

Nancy Selover will open the discussion with a presentation on what extreme heat is and what to expect for the Phoenix area. Following Nancy’s introduction, the panelists will discuss extreme heat impacts and how we can respond to this challenge.

DCDC Water/Climate Briefings provide a forum for researchers, policy makers, and the interested public to engage in dialogue about the impacts of extreme weather events on our lives.

Join the conversation!

Panelists

Nancy Selover
State Climatologist, Arizona State Climate Office
Research Professor, Arizona State University

Sharon Harlan
Professor, School of Human Evolution and Social Change
Arizona State University

Mikhail Chester
Assistant Professor, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment
Arizona State University

Brande Mead
Human Services Program Manager
Maricopa Association of Governments

Vjollca Berisha
Sr. Epidemiologist
Maricopa County

Anne Reichman
Moderator and Program Manager
Sustainable Cities Network
Arizona State University

When

Wednesday, October 1, 2014 12:00-1:30 p.m.

RSVP Today

Email Katie Peige.

Location

Decision Center for a Desert City, 21 East 6th Street, Suite 126B, Tempe [Map]

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2013-2014 Water/Climate Briefings – Communicating Sustainability in Complex Systems for Public Policy

March 5, 2014 – Arizona Water Supply Sustainability: In-state Water Transfers

Moving water from one area of Arizona to another has the potential to create controversies, especially if the area from which the water is being transferred has existing water uses and economies built on that water supply.

In the Arizona Department of Water Resources report, “Arizona’s Next Century: A Strategic Vision for Water Supply Sustainability”, it is suggested that in-state water transfers will play a strategic role in Arizona’s sustainable water future. Yet, the report suggests that a comprehensive analysis of water transfers is needed to better understand their role in our water future and their secondary benefits and impacts.

In this Water/Climate Briefing, our panelists will use Yuma County as a case study to begin identifying the issues about water transfers that we need to better understand and what type of further dialogue and research is needed.

Join the conversation!

Panelists

Michael J. Lacey WCB_Mar5_2014_225
Director, Arizona Department of Water Resources
State of Arizona

Patrick L. Morgan
Manager, Yuma Mesa Irrigation and Drainage District

Paul Muthart
General Manager, Pasquinelli Produce Co.
Yuma, Arizona

Dave D. White
Co-director, Decision Center for a Desert City
Arizona State University

Ray Quay
Moderator
Director of Stakeholder Relations, Decision Center for a Desert City
Arizona State University

Welcome by Jonathan Koppell
Dean of the College of Public Programs and the Lattie and Elva
Coor Presidential Chair in the School of Public Affairs

RSVP Today

Contact Katie Peige

When

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 12:00-1:30 p.m.

Location

ASU Downtown Phoenix campus, A. E. England Building, 424 N. Central Ave., Phoenix [Map]

Transit Options

Also note that the A.E. England building is located next to a the Central Station Transfer station which features the Van Buren light rail stop, several bus routes (including express buses and the DASH), and bike lockers. For more information, please click here. For those coming from ASU’s main campus in Tempe, there is an additional option to take the FREE intercampus shuttle that leaves every half hour (on the hour and on the half hour) and deposits you across the street from the A.E. England building, make sure you take the MAROON route.

February 5, 2014 – Communicating Complex Information to Enhance Decision Making

Complexity is an inescapable aspect of environmental decision making as individuals and institutions try to make informed choices with complex and uncertain information.

One major challenge stems from the need to communicate complexity and frame information in a way that is relevant and useful for decision makers.

In this Water/Climate Briefing, our panelists will discuss techniques – such as information products/simulation models, scenarios, and decisional games – for communicating complexity in policy and governance processes for water sustainability and climate change adaptation.

Panelists will describe examples at multiple scales – from water management in Phoenix to global climate change negotiations – that illustrate the challenges and opportunities of communicating complexity.

Join the conversation!

Panelists

Andy Terrey
Project Coordinator
Water Resource Department
City of Phoenix

Erik Johnston
Associate Professor of Policy Informatics
School of Public Affairs
Arizona State University

Manjana Milkoreit
Postdoctoral Fellow
Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiative
Arizona State University

Dave White
Moderator
Co-Director, Decision Center for a Desert City
Arizona State University

When

Wednesday, February 5, 2014 12:00-1:30 p.m.

Location

Decision Center for a Desert City, 21 East 6th Street, Suite 126B, Tempe [Map]

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December 2, 2013 – Visualizing Climate Change to Develop Local Solutions

How do we communicate and visually demonstrate the invisible threat of climate change in our local communities?

In his recent book, Visualizing Climate Change: A Guide to Visual Communication of Climate Change and Developing Local Solutions, Dr. Stephen Sheppard demonstrates how we can use climate change visualizations to assist decision makers and inspire a call to action.

Using dramatic visual imagery such as 3D and 4D visualizations of future landscapes, community mapping, and iconic photographs, extensive color imagery explains how climate change works where we live, and reveals how we often conceal, misinterpret, or overlook the evidence of climate change impacts and our carbon usage that causes them.

Dr. Sheppard received a BA/MA in Agricultural and Forest Sciences from Oxford, a MSc. in Forestry at the University of British Columbia, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Planning at University of California, Berkeley. Considered an expert in visualization, Sheppard has over 30 years experience in environmental assessment and public participation internationally.

Join the conversation!

Keynote Speaker

Stephen R. L. Sheppard, Ph.D., ASLA, Professor
Director of Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP)
Faculty of Applied Sciences, School of Architecture & Landscape Architecture; Forest Resources Management, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia

VisualizingClimateChangeSheppard teaches in sustainable landscape planning, aesthetics, and visualization in the Faculty of Forestry and Landscape Architecture programme at UBC. He received a BA/MA in Agricultural and Forest Sciences at Oxford, a MSc. in Forestry at UBC, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Planning at UC. Berkeley.

He directs the Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP), an interdisciplinary research group using perception-testing and immersive/interactive visualization to support public awareness and collaborative planning on sustainability issues. He has over 30 years’ experience in environmental assessment and public participation internationally.

He has written or co-written two books on visual simulation, and co-edited “Forests and Landscapes: Linking Ecology, Sustainability, and Aesthetics”, Volume 6 in the IUFRO Research series. Current research interests lie in perceptions of climate change, the aesthetics of sustainability, and visualization theory and ethics.

For more information about Dr. Sheppard:
UBC Forestry Profile
Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning

When

Monday, December 2, 2013, 9:30-11:00 a.m.

Location

ASU’s Memorial Union Turquoise Room, Room 220, Tempe [Map]

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November 6, 2013 – Extreme Climate Events: Long-term Drought in the Southwest

In this talk, Grossmann examines droughts in the Southwest to demonstrate that extreme weather events are not stationary over time, with the impacts of global warming and multi-decadal climate variability.

Given the magnitude of the projected impacts, she recommends that water managers explicitly incorporate both global warming and multi-decadal variability into their long-term planning.

Join the conversation!

Guest Speaker

Iris Grossmann, Ph.D.
Iris Grossmann is a Research Scientist at Carnegie Mellon’s Center for Climate and Energy Decision Making (CEDM). She holds a Ph.D. in Geosciences/Meteorology from the University of Hamburg, Germany and the International Max Planck Research School for Earth System Modeling. Dr. Grossmann’s research and teaching at CEDM explore adaptation to growing climate risks given the combined impacts of global warming and internal climate variability, as well as increasing vulnerability of human and natural systems. Current projects focus on US hurricane risks and droughts in the US Southwest and in Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

When

Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 12:00-1:30 p.m.

Location

Decision Center for a Desert City, 21 East 6th Street, Suite 126B, Tempe [Map]

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October 16, 2013 – Effective Communication of Scenarios and Scenario Analysis for Decision Making

Scenarios are one method to describe the complexity and uncertainty inherent within the management of complex systems.

The development and analysis of these scenarios is an effective method to synthesize simple facts about a system’s complexity and uncertainty that can be used as a guide for decisionmaking.

Our panelists will focus on how to communicate effectively scenarios and scenario analysis to a wide audience of the general public, policy professionals, and political decision makers in order to facilitate effective and sustainable system management.

Join the conversation!

Panelists

Charles A. Cullom
Manager, Colorado River Programs
Central Arizona Project

Arnim Wiek
Associate Professor
School of Sustainability
Arizona State University

Wally R. Wilson
Chief Hydrologist
Water Resources Management
Tucson Water

Ray Quay
Moderator
Director of Stakeholder Relations
Decision Center for a Desert City
Arizona State University

When

Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 12:00-1:30 p.m.

Location

Decision Center for a Desert City, 21 East 6th Street, Suite 126B, Tempe [Map]

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DCDC Water/Climate Briefing – October 16, 2013 from DCDC@ASU on Vimeo.

September 4, 2013 – Challenges of Communicating Sustainability in Complex Systems for Public Policy

In our first Water/Climate Briefing for the 2013-2014 academic year, DCDC set the stage for a wide-ranging discussion of critical issues in the realms of science and policy for this year’s theme: Communicating Sustainability in Complex Systems for Public Policy.

Our panelists explored:

  • Understanding sustainability and complex systems
  • Communicating sustainability and climate change for public policy
  • Design of governance arrangements to transcend political borders
  • Design and administration of complex organizations
  • The role of global governance organizations in sustainability
  • Incorporating complexity into water resources decision making
  • Innovative tools for communicating complexity for public policy

We aim to provide opportunities for researchers, policy makers, and the interested public to engage in informed dialogue about the challenges and opportunities for decision making about sustainability in complex systems.

Join the conversation!

Panelists

Jonathan Koppell
Dean, College of Public Programs
Lattie and Elva Coor Presidential Chair, School of Public Affairs
Arizona State University

Michael Schoon
Assistant Professor, Environmental Policy
School of Sustainability
Arizona State University

Doug Toy
Water Regulatory Affairs Manager
City of Chandler

Dave White
Moderator
Co-Director, Decision Center for a Desert City
Arizona State University

When

Wednesday, September 4, 2013, 12:00-1:30 p.m.

Location

Decision Center for a Desert City, 21 East 6th Street, Suite 126B, Tempe [Map]

DCDC Water/Climate Briefing – September 4, 2013 from DCDC@ASU on Vimeo.

September 2011-May 2013 Water/Climate Briefing Archive